Geeking Out Over History

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Random facts that will probably only interest the blogmistress.
Includes posts from all eras of history. Although the blogmistress is currently suffering with an unhealthy interest with the English monarchs of the 15th century!

(Sister site: http://fangirl-ramblings.tumblr.com)



twitter.com/Louise2212:

    Richard, Duke of Gloucester, was the youngest son of Richard, Duke of York and Cecily Neville. By the time his brother became King Edward IV, when Richard was just eleven, he had already endured many hardships, including the deaths of his beloved father and eldest brother Edmund, and foreign exile. However, he soon proved himself to be a young man of character: he was a valiant warrior and a fiercely loyal subject. Though he (likely already) had two illegitimate children when he married Anne Neville, he seems to have been faithful to her—highly unusual for the time. Richard was, of course, hardly a saint. Yet while questions remain concerning his actions following Edward’s death in 1483, the fact remains that he was a remarkably successful and socially-conscious king despite his his brief reign. He died bravely in the summer of 1485 and remains the last English king to have fallen in battle.

    (Source: peremadeleine, via tiny-librarian)

    — 6 hours ago with 299 notes
    did-you-kno:

In 1922, a large riot broke out in New York due to people wearing straw hats.   Source

    did-you-kno:

    In 1922, a large riot broke out in New York due to people wearing straw hats. Source

    (via imnotinthefruitbusiness)

    — 23 hours ago with 2211 notes
    olga-nikolayevna:

Four Sisters by H Rappaport ♔ favourite quotes [8/?]
From the start the Tatiana Committee proved to be a great success, in no small part thanks to Tatiana….[but] she disliked the formalities, as one official recalled when he addressed her at a committee: “If you should so please your imperial highness…” Tatiana was visibly embarrassed: ‘she looked at me in astonishment, and when I sat down next to her again, she gave me a sharp nudge  under the table and whispered: “Are you off your head or what, to address me in that way?” 

    olga-nikolayevna:

    Four Sisters by H Rappaport ♔ favourite quotes [8/?]

    From the start the Tatiana Committee proved to be a great success, in no small part thanks to Tatiana….[but] she disliked the formalities, as one official recalled when he addressed her at a committee: “If you should so please your imperial highness…” Tatiana was visibly embarrassed: ‘she looked at me in astonishment, and when I sat down next to her again, she gave me a sharp nudge  under the table and whispered: “Are you off your head or what, to address me in that way?” 

    (via tiny-librarian)

    — 1 day ago with 36 notes
    tiny-librarian:

Maud of Wales, Queen of Norway as the wife of Haakon VII.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    Maud of Wales, Queen of Norway as the wife of Haakon VII.

    Source

    — 1 day ago with 109 notes
    historical-nonfiction:

Jeffrey Hudson was born, amusingly, in the smallest county in England -Rutland County- on June 14, 1619. His parents were ordinary stock, as were all his brothers and sisters. But Jeffrey simply did not grow. At seven he stood 18 inches tall. Everyone in the area, including the Duchess of Buckingham was curious about him. At her request, Jeffrey’s parents walked him a mile or so to the Duchesses’ mansion. From then on, Jeffrey would be dressed in velvets, silks, and satins, with two servants to attend his every need. The whim of the wealthy saved him from a life as a country fair attraction — instead only the titled, rich, and intelligentsia could laugh at Jeffrey. He eventually became a pet project of the Queen of England, and remained part of her entourage through the English Civil War. The story of the rest of his life sounds like a adventure novel, with pirates and storms at sea and duels.

    historical-nonfiction:

    Jeffrey Hudson was born, amusingly, in the smallest county in England -Rutland County- on June 14, 1619. His parents were ordinary stock, as were all his brothers and sisters. But Jeffrey simply did not grow. At seven he stood 18 inches tall. Everyone in the area, including the Duchess of Buckingham was curious about him. At her request, Jeffrey’s parents walked him a mile or so to the Duchesses’ mansion. From then on, Jeffrey would be dressed in velvets, silks, and satins, with two servants to attend his every need. The whim of the wealthy saved him from a life as a country fair attraction — instead only the titled, rich, and intelligentsia could laugh at Jeffrey. He eventually became a pet project of the Queen of England, and remained part of her entourage through the English Civil War. The story of the rest of his life sounds like a adventure novel, with pirates and storms at sea and duels.

    — 2 days ago with 325 notes
    tiny-librarian:

Detail of the statue of Elizabeth Feodorovna (Ella of Hesse) above the Great West door at Westminster Abbey in London, England.
She is one of the ten martyrs from the 20th century, from different places around the world, that are depicted there.
Image Source

    tiny-librarian:

    Detail of the statue of Elizabeth Feodorovna (Ella of Hesse) above the Great West door at Westminster Abbey in London, England.

    She is one of the ten martyrs from the 20th century, from different places around the world, that are depicted there.

    Image Source

    — 2 days ago with 28 notes

    fashionsfromhistory:

    "1866 Doll" from the Gratitude Train

    Marcelle Chaumont

    1949

    MET

    — 3 days ago with 800 notes
    history-of-fashion:

1674 Jan Verkolje - Portrait of Johan de la Faille

    history-of-fashion:

    1674 Jan Verkolje - Portrait of Johan de la Faille

    (via lordozner)

    — 3 days ago with 18 notes
    teacupnosaucer:

awenyddogamulosx:

ruthlesswoodcarver:

mothensidhe:

fatfury:

omgxchrissy:

cumleak:

deux-zero-deux:

demands-with-menace:

Queen Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt. She has a lovely smile for someone who’s been dead for thousands of years.

she wasn’t a queen. she was a pharaoh and wanted to be referred to as such. she even had her statues modeled after the male pharaoh’s statues to state her dominance and authority. she was actually one of the most successful pharaohs in all of ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman in power in egypt.

damn no wonder she died and smiled for a trillion years afterwards

The fact that we know about her is marvelous.
the next Pharaoh after her Tuthmosis III  tried to erase Hatshepsut out of history ,chiseled her name off her monuments ,covered the text on her obelisks with stone,knocked down and defaced her statues .
she was even left off the list of pharaohs ..talk about some patriarchy bullshit
her name was lost for a couple of millennia, her body was found in a unmarked grave  in early twentieth century
sad part is in Egyptian belief is  if your are forgotten in the living world you don’t exist in the afterlife,so he was trying to kill her even in death 

My best friend throwing down some herstory. A+ commentary

She wore a fake beard, you guys.She was the fucking boss.

If we remember her now does that save her from an awful afterlife?

I’m just picturing the Kemetic afterlife. All the Pharaohs are hanging out in some kind of swanky club, drinking and congratulating each other on being bros. 
The doors slam open and Hatshepsut strides in, glorious, robes swirling, rocking the fake beard and the insane amounts of wealth and power. “Miss me, bitches?” 

this post was amazing from start to finish

    teacupnosaucer:

    awenyddogamulosx:

    ruthlesswoodcarver:

    mothensidhe:

    fatfury:

    omgxchrissy:

    cumleak:

    deux-zero-deux:

    demands-with-menace:

    Queen Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt. She has a lovely smile for someone who’s been dead for thousands of years.

    she wasn’t a queen. she was a pharaoh and wanted to be referred to as such. she even had her statues modeled after the male pharaoh’s statues to state her dominance and authority. she was actually one of the most successful pharaohs in all of ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman in power in egypt.

    damn no wonder she died and smiled for a trillion years afterwards

    The fact that we know about her is marvelous.

    the next Pharaoh after her Tuthmosis III  tried to erase Hatshepsut out of history ,chiseled her name off her monuments ,covered the text on her obelisks with stone,knocked down and defaced her statues .

    she was even left off the list of pharaohs ..talk about some patriarchy bullshit

    her name was lost for a couple of millennia, her body was found in a unmarked grave  in early twentieth century

    sad part is in Egyptian belief is  if your are forgotten in the living world you don’t exist in the afterlife,so he was trying to kill her even in death 

    My best friend throwing down some herstory. A+ commentary

    She wore a fake beard, you guys.
    She was the fucking boss.

    If we remember her now does that save her from an awful afterlife?

    I’m just picturing the Kemetic afterlife. All the Pharaohs are hanging out in some kind of swanky club, drinking and congratulating each other on being bros. 

    The doors slam open and Hatshepsut strides in, glorious, robes swirling, rocking the fake beard and the insane amounts of wealth and power. “Miss me, bitches?” 

    this post was amazing from start to finish

    (Source: xxerlflynn, via stardust-pond)

    — 4 days ago with 216520 notes

    marthajefferson:

    history meme: 01/01 war | The Hundred Years’ War

    The Hundred Years’ War was a series of conflicts waged from 1337 to 1453 between the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of France for control of the French throne. The war had its roots in a dynastic disagreement dating back to the time of William the Conqueror, who became King of England in 1066 while retaining possession of the Duchy of Normandy in France. The question of legal succession to the French crown was central to the war over generations of English and French claimants.
    The war is commonly divided into three phases separated by truces: the Edwardian Era War (1337–1360), the Caroline War (1369–1389) and the Lancastrian War (1415–1453), which saw the slow decline of English fortunes after the appearance of Joan of Arc in 1429. The term “Hundred Years’ War” is a periodization invented later by historians to encompass all of these events.
    Although primarily a dynastic conflict, the war gave impetus to ideas of French and English nationalism. Militarily, it saw the introduction of weapons and tactics that supplanted the feudal armies dominated by heavy cavalry. The first standing armies in Western Europe since the time of the Western Roman Empire were introduced for the war, thus changing the role of the peasantry. For all this, as well as for its duration, it is often viewed as one of the most significant conflicts in medieval warfare. English political forces over time came to oppose the costly venture; while English nobles’ dissatisfactions, resulting from the loss of their continental landholdings, was a factor leading to War of the Roses civil war. In France, civil wars, deadly epidemics, famines and bandit free companies of mercenaries reduced the population drastically. [x]

    (via houseplantagenet)

    — 5 days ago with 1577 notes

    jeannepompadour:

    Effigy of Joanna de Bohun (d. 1327) 

    (via thecreativehistorian)

    — 5 days ago with 52 notes

    daughter-of-castile:

    allinablur:

    Reigning Monarchs of the Kingdom of Portugal [3/4] — The Dynasty of Habsburg (1580 - 1640)

    The Philippine Dynasty, also known as the House of Habsburg in Portugal, was the third royal house of Portugal. It was named after the three Spanish kings who ruled the Portuguese territories between 1580 and 1640 in a dynastic union of the two crowns. The three kings were all named Filipe (Spanish: Felipe; English: Philip). This Iberian union followed the 1580 Portuguese succession crisis caused by the untimely death of king Sebastião in 1578 in the Battle of Alcácer-Quibir. He left no descendents, just like his immediate successor (and great-uncle) Cardinal-King Henrique I. There were several claimants to the throne, but Felipe II of Spain, a grandson of king Manuel I of Portugal, ended up taking over the country.

    Length of reign:

    • D. FIlipe I (1580-1598)
    • D. FIlipe II (1598-1621)
    • D. Filipe III (1621-1640)
    The most beloved Kings of Portugal ^-^.
    LOL

    (Source: museodelprado.es, via lordozner)

    — 6 days ago with 49 notes

    tiny-librarian:

    Prince Sigismund, the fourth child of Vicky and Fritz, was born on 11 September, 1864. Both parents doted on this young prince, who seemed so much more clever and intelligent than their other children. Vicky was even convinced he would come to resemble her beloved father. But their pleasure was short lived. Sigismund died from meningitis on 18 June, 1866, aged twenty-one months.

    VIcky’s grief and despair were intense. When the child fell ill, Fritz had been away from home, leading the Prussian forces into battle against Austria. He had taken all the available doctors with him to the front, and so Vicky was powerless to alleviate the suffering of her child or to prevent his death. She poured out her misery in letters to Queen Victoria: ‘My pride, my joy, my hope, is gone, gone.’ And, a few days later, ‘Oh to see it suffer so cruelly, to see it die and hear its last piteous cry - was an agony I cannot describe, it haunts me night and day!’ The memory of Sigismund’s death was to haunt Vicky for the rest of her life.

    Queen Victoria’s Grandchildren - Lance Salway

    — 6 days ago with 37 notes
    msmrmusic:

Ruby’s lips, Salvador Dalí, 1949

    msmrmusic:

    Ruby’s lips, Salvador Dalí, 1949

    (Source: thedoppelganger, via lordozner)

    — 6 days ago with 13311 notes