Geeking Out Over History

Any requests?   Submit a post  

Random facts that will probably only interest the blogmistress.
Includes posts from all eras of history. Although the blogmistress is currently suffering with an unhealthy interest with the English monarchs of the 15th century!

(Sister site: http://fangirl-ramblings.tumblr.com)



twitter.com/Louise2212:

    the-world-turning:

lissabryan:

Katharine was only six years older than Henry. If she was “pathetic and old,” he was, too. Especially since he was chasing around his wife’s maids of honor, who weren’t even born yet when he first got married.

Katharine was only twenty-four when they married, a beautiful young princess in the prime of life. And let’s not forget, Henry chose her, not vice-versa. Whether he did it for love … or because she was the daughter of the powerful “Catholic Kings” of Spain … or because Katharine’s ancestral claim to the English throne was actually stronger than Henry’s … Henry was the one who decided they should marry. He wanted to marry her so badly, he lied about his father begging him on his deathbed to marry the Spanish princess and fulfill the betrothal.
In her youth, Katharine was lovely. We don’t see it often, because most of her widely-known portraits were made after Katharine was in middle age, her body worn out by numerous pregnancies. And in the movies, she’s always portrayed as a dark-haired, middle-aged woman. But when she was young, Katharine was regarded as a beauty, with strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes. 

Artist Michael Sittow seems to have seen Katharine as a muse. He painted several portraits of the princess.

Katharine as the Virgin

Katharine as the Magdalene
During her marriage to Henry, Katharine was pregnant at least six times - possibly eight. As she told Henry during the Great Matter, “By me you have had many children, though it has pleased God to call them from the world.” Katharine’s only “failure” was that her three baby boys died, either before birth or shortly thereafter.
Katharine was an amazing queen and a strong woman. As much as I love Anne Boleyn, I admire Katharine for her virtues and regal fortitude. She died fighting for her rightful title, and the inheritance rights of her daughter. Because of her refusal to capitulate, she never got to see her daughter again, a terrible price for any mother to pay.
In the end, it really wasn’t about having a son for Henry. It was about his own desires. An heir was only an excuse. That’s why he executed Anne Boleyn when she still had plenty of fertile years left, and annulled his marriage to Anna von Kleefes without even trying. Not to mention his final marriage to Kateryn Parr, widely regarded as being infertile after not producing any children in either of her previous marriages.
If anyone was pathetic, it was Henry, whose mid-life crisis shattered a thousand years of religious tradition and led to oceans of spilled blood. Not to mention his horrific lack of concern for the lives of anyone who got in the way of his immediate desires. 

PREACH

    the-world-turning:

    lissabryan:

    Katharine was only six years older than Henry. If she was “pathetic and old,” he was, too. Especially since he was chasing around his wife’s maids of honor, who weren’t even born yet when he first got married.

    Katharine was only twenty-four when they married, a beautiful young princess in the prime of life. And let’s not forget, Henry chose her, not vice-versa. Whether he did it for love … or because she was the daughter of the powerful “Catholic Kings” of Spain … or because Katharine’s ancestral claim to the English throne was actually stronger than Henry’s … Henry was the one who decided they should marry. He wanted to marry her so badly, he lied about his father begging him on his deathbed to marry the Spanish princess and fulfill the betrothal.

    In her youth, Katharine was lovely. We don’t see it often, because most of her widely-known portraits were made after Katharine was in middle age, her body worn out by numerous pregnancies. And in the movies, she’s always portrayed as a dark-haired, middle-aged woman. But when she was young, Katharine was regarded as a beauty, with strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes. 

    Artist Michael Sittow seems to have seen Katharine as a muse. He painted several portraits of the princess.

    Katharine as the Virgin

    Katharine as the Magdalene

    During her marriage to Henry, Katharine was pregnant at least six times - possibly eight. As she told Henry during the Great Matter, “By me you have had many children, though it has pleased God to call them from the world.” Katharine’s only “failure” was that her three baby boys died, either before birth or shortly thereafter.

    Katharine was an amazing queen and a strong woman. As much as I love Anne Boleyn, I admire Katharine for her virtues and regal fortitude. She died fighting for her rightful title, and the inheritance rights of her daughter. Because of her refusal to capitulate, she never got to see her daughter again, a terrible price for any mother to pay.

    In the end, it really wasn’t about having a son for Henry. It was about his own desires. An heir was only an excuse. That’s why he executed Anne Boleyn when she still had plenty of fertile years left, and annulled his marriage to Anna von Kleefes without even trying. Not to mention his final marriage to Kateryn Parr, widely regarded as being infertile after not producing any children in either of her previous marriages.

    If anyone was pathetic, it was Henry, whose mid-life crisis shattered a thousand years of religious tradition and led to oceans of spilled blood. Not to mention his horrific lack of concern for the lives of anyone who got in the way of his immediate desires. 

    PREACH

    (Source: real-tudor-confessions, via bethwoodvilles)

    — 10 hours ago with 1319 notes

    coloursilluminateweareshining:

    History Meme» Lady Jane Grey

    Jane was nominal queen of England for just nine days in 1553, as part of an unsuccessful bid to prevent the accession of the Catholic Mary Tudor.

    Jane was born in the autumn of 1537, the daughter of the Marquess of Dorset. Through her mother, Lady Frances Brandon, she was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII. At around the age of 10, Jane entered the household of Henry VIII’s last queen, Katherine Parr where she was exposed to a strongly Protestant, academic environment. Jane developed into an intelligent and pious woman.

    In October 1551, her father was created duke of Suffolk and Jane began to appear at court. There, real power lay in the hands of the fiercely Protestant Duke of Northumberland, who acted as regent to the young king, Edward VI. In May 1553, Jane was married to Northumberland’s son, Lord Guildford Dudley.

    It became clear that Edward was dying, and Northumberland was desperate to prevent the throne passing to Edward’s half-sister and heir, the Catholic Mary Tudor. Northumberland persuaded the king to declare Mary illegitimate, as well as Edward’s other half-sister Elizabeth, and alter the line of succession to pass to Jane.

    Edward died on 6 July 1553. Four days later, Jane was proclaimed queen. However, Mary Tudor had widespread popular support and by mid-July, even Suffolk had abandoned his daughter and was attempting to save himself by proclaiming Mary queen. Northumberland’s supporters melted away and Suffolk easily persuaded his daughter to relinquish the crown.

    Mary imprisoned Jane, her husband and her father in the Tower of London. While Suffolk was pardoned, Jane and her husband were tried for high treason in November 1553. Jane pleaded guilty and was sentenced to death. The carrying out of the sentence was suspended, but Suffolk’s support for Sir Thomas Wyatt’s rebellion in February 1554 sealed Jane’s fate. On 12 February, she and her husband were beheaded. Her father followed them two days later.

    (via houseplantagenet)

    — 18 hours ago with 271 notes
    queenwydville:

get to know me meme: [4/-] favourite historical couplesELEANOR OF AQUITAINE & KING HENRY II

Two more strong-minded, forceful and determined people could hardly have been matched. Eleanor, who was about thirty, had already been queen of France for fifteen years through her first marriage and by her second she would soon be queen of England. Daughter and heiress of William X, Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou, she was beautiful, wanton, capricious, sophisticated, highly intelligent and accustomed to having her own way. Henry was nineteen years old, bull-necked, stocky and freckled, a man of electric energy and ferocious impatience, compelling charm and an ungovernable temper.


Over the next twelve years Eleanor bore Henry five sons and three daughters. Two of their sons, Richard and John, would be kings of England. She played a prominent part in government and a patron’s role in the development of both troubadour poetry and the Arthurian legends. Not surprisingly, her life with Henry was stormy. She may well have encouraged her sons to rebel against their father in 1173 and after that he kept her penned up as a prisoner in England until he died in 1189. Under both Richard and John she was active in matters of state and she died eventually in a nunnery at Fontrevault in Anjou in her early eighties in 1204, having been for much of a lifetime probably the most powerful woman in Europe.

{[inspiration]}

    queenwydville:

    get to know me meme: [4/-] favourite historical couples
    ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE & KING HENRY II

    Two more strong-minded, forceful and determined people could hardly have been matched. Eleanor, who was about thirty, had already been queen of France for fifteen years through her first marriage and by her second she would soon be queen of England. Daughter and heiress of William X, Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitou, she was beautiful, wanton, capricious, sophisticated, highly intelligent and accustomed to having her own way. Henry was nineteen years old, bull-necked, stocky and freckled, a man of electric energy and ferocious impatience, compelling charm and an ungovernable temper.

    Over the next twelve years Eleanor bore Henry five sons and three daughters. Two of their sons, Richard and John, would be kings of England. She played a prominent part in government and a patron’s role in the development of both troubadour poetry and the Arthurian legends. Not surprisingly, her life with Henry was stormy. She may well have encouraged her sons to rebel against their father in 1173 and after that he kept her penned up as a prisoner in England until he died in 1189. Under both Richard and John she was active in matters of state and she died eventually in a nunnery at Fontrevault in Anjou in her early eighties in 1204, having been for much of a lifetime probably the most powerful woman in Europe.

    {[inspiration]}

    (Source: tudorquene, via houseplantagenet)

    — 1 day ago with 76 notes
    tiny-librarian:

Mary of Teck while she was Duchess of York.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    Mary of Teck while she was Duchess of York.

    Source

    — 1 day ago with 18 notes

    ancientart:

    Details from the Egyptian Tomb of Sennedjem in the necropolis of Deir el-Medina. Sennedjem lived in the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II during the 19th Dynasty.

    Photos courtesy of & taken by kairoinfo4u.

    (via porphyrogenneta)

    — 2 days ago with 5629 notes

    tiny-librarian:

    Children of Royalty: James II, Part One

    With Anne Hyde

    • Charles, Duke of Cambridge
    • Mary II of England
    • James, Duke of Cambridge
    • Anne, Queen of Great Britain
    • Charles, Duke of Kendal
    • Edgar, Duke of Cambridge
    • Henrietta
    • Catherine
    — 2 days ago with 6 notes
    Your Ancestors Didn’t Sleep Like You -- They Slept Twice! →

    historical-nonfiction:

    Before the 1800s, the common, accepted, assumed way of sleeping was radically different than our modern habits. In fact, most people would find it bizarre. People slept for three or four hours, then woke up for a few hours, then went back to sleep until morning. You should read the rest of the article, its really interesting!

    (via stardust-pond)

    — 3 days ago with 819 notes
    #society 
    historysquee:

Elizabeth I
By Taddeo Zuccari
Oil on panel 

    historysquee:

    Elizabeth I

    By Taddeo Zuccari

    Oil on panel 

    (via lordozner)

    — 3 days ago with 75 notes

    mensonien:

    Anna Porphyrogenita (963 – 1011)

    Anna Porphyrogenita  was a Grand Princess consort of Kiev; she was married to Grand Prince Vladimir the Great.

    Anna was the daughter of Byzantine Emperor Romanos II and the Empress Theophano. She was also the sister of Emperors Basil II Bulgaroktonos (The Bulgar-Slayer) and Constantine VIII. Anna was a Porphyrogenita, a legitimate daughter born in the special purple chamber of the Byzantine Emperor’s Palace.

    Anna did not wish to marry Vladimir and expressed deep distress on her way to her wedding. Grand Prince Vladimir was impressed by Byzantine religious practices and his marriage to Anna led to his decision to convert to Eastern Christianity. Grand Prince Vladimir also began Christianizing his kingdom. By marriage to Grand Prince Vladimir, Anna became Grand Princess of Kiev, but in practice, she was referred to as Queen or Czarina, probably as a sign of her membership of the Imperial Byzantine House. Anna participated actively in the Christianization of Rus: she acted as the religious adviser of Vladimir and founded a few convents and churches herself.

    (via houseplantagenet)

    — 4 days ago with 63 notes
    mapsontheweb:


Europe, 1919, after the First World War. The turbulent inter-war years begin.
Read More

    mapsontheweb:

    Europe, 1919, after the First World War. The turbulent inter-war years begin.

    Read More

    (via gimmetea)

    — 4 days ago with 259 notes
    Before They Left Africa, Early Modern Humans Were Already 'Culturally Diverse' →

    archaeologicalnews:

    Oxford — A new study provides fresh insights into the life of early modern humans in North Africa, the only land route into Eurasia. Researchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan…

    (via gimmetea)

    — 5 days ago with 255 notes

    greek-museums:

    Archaeological Museum of Lamia:

    In my opinion one of the most important and beautiful votive reliefs of the greek antiquity.

    A young mother is making a thank-offering to Artemis-Eileithyia, protector of women during labour. A senior woman is holding a pyxis (jewellery case). She is perhaps the mother, or mother-in-law of the young woman. A servant girl is following with a tray of offerings: grapes, apples, pomegranates, honey-sweets. The young mother procceeds holding the infant for the goddess’s inspection. A servant follows leading the sacrificial bull to the altar of the goddess. Artemis is turned to the adorants and holds a torch- a symbol the chthonic character of deities.

    Unique is the representation of the clothes and shoes the young mother wore during the birth and which are dedicated to the goddess.

    These details prove that the cult of Artemis in ancient Echinos had close affinities to that in Brauron in Attica.

    From (Achinos) Ancient Echinos (late 4th- early 3rd century B.C)

    Just looking at it I can’t help but remember this epigram by Leonidas of Tarantas. It is suggested that the epigram itself is inspired by a similar votive relief.

    This votive relief was enough to send me driving to Brauron yesterday. I hadn’t been to the museum after its renovation, so the really great displays were quite a surprise for me. Not only is the museum of Brauron one of the most important museums of Attica, filled with a wealth of information about the cult of Artemis, but it is also a heartening glimpse into the world of the children-especially young girls-of the antiquity.

    The most unique aspect of this museum are the fragments from very finely painted vessels. In fact anyone who has any interest in ancient painting should definitely pay this museum a visit.

    (via thecreativehistorian)

    — 5 days ago with 34 notes

    mediumaevum:

    According to surviving records, a cucking stool was used since the 13th century to punish “disorderly women, scolds and dishonest tradesmen” by dunking them in water (usually a river). This form of public humiliation was often used at the time. 

    One New Jersey law prescribing ducking for scolds remained on the books, if overlooked, until the year 1972 when it was finally thrown out by a state judge.

    images: (top) A 17th century woodcut, (bottom) Ducking stool at Leominster, last used in 1809

    (Source: medievaltravel.co.uk, via lordozner)

    — 6 days ago with 232 notes
    historical-nonfiction:

This is wallpaper from Tudor England. It used to decorate the inside of a box holding legal papers, and survived because the contents of the box were deemed important and catalogued, while the unimportant box was left behind.
The wallpaper was made by a process called block printing. First the pattern was carved onto blocks of wood. Then the design was printed on the paper over and over by hand. This piece of wallpaper displays the Royal Arms and badges, the emblem of St George, Tudor Roses and grotesques (ugly faces)

    historical-nonfiction:

    This is wallpaper from Tudor England. It used to decorate the inside of a box holding legal papers, and survived because the contents of the box were deemed important and catalogued, while the unimportant box was left behind.

    The wallpaper was made by a process called block printing. First the pattern was carved onto blocks of wood. Then the design was printed on the paper over and over by hand. This piece of wallpaper displays the Royal Arms and badges, the emblem of St George, Tudor Roses and grotesques (ugly faces)

    — 6 days ago with 343 notes