Geeking Out Over History

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Random facts that will probably only interest the blogmistress Includes posts from all eras of history.

Although the blogmistress is currently suffering with an unhealthy interest with the English monarchs of the 15th century!

(Sister site: http://fangirl-ramblings.tumblr.com)



twitter.com/Louise2212:

    Will The Great Recession Do This Too?

    historical-nonfiction:

    During Great Depression, Americans’ families were drastically changed. Many couples delayed marriage, and divorce rates and birth rates dropped. Some men also abandoned their families; a 1940 poll revealed that 1.5 million married women were abandoned by their husbands. No one checked if they returned after the war created prosperity, but I doubt it.

    (Source: facts.randomhistory.com)

    — 4 hours ago with 104 notes

    historyofromanovs:

    Get to Know Me Meme || [2/5] royal siblings

    The Children of Tsar Paul I of Russia

    The lives of the ten children of Tsar Paul, the only legitimate child of Catherine the Great, and his wife Tsaritsa Maria Feodorovna, were full of intriguing stories. Many of the children, born in the span of twenty-one years, were described to be lovable, intelligent, very talented, caring and most thoughtful. Like the large family of Queen Victoria of Britain, the Russian royal siblings had many descendants in other European royal families.

    (via queen-of-the-dreadfort)

    — 15 hours ago with 75 notes
    tiny-librarian:


Two thousand and forty four years ago today, August 1st, in 30 B.C., Marc Antony committed suicide by falling on his own sword. He had suffered serious desertions among his troops the day before during the Battle of Alexandria and, despite an early victory, the desertions proved too much and he was ultimately defeated. After returning to Alexandria, he received false information that his wife, Cleopatra VII, had already taken her own life.
After he stabbed himself he was told she wasn’t really dead, and he was taken to her where she was in hiding with her ladies in her mausoleum. Unfortunately the doors were barred and the dying man had to be hauled up to her through a window. He survived for only a few minutes after he reached her, and died in Cleopatra’s arms.
Cleopatra herself would take her own life eleven days later, and their three children were taken to Rome to be raised by Antony’s third wife, Octavia. With Cleopatra’s death, and the subsequent murder of her eldest son, Caesarion, Egypt became a Roman Province.

    tiny-librarian:

    Two thousand and forty four years ago today, August 1st, in 30 B.C., Marc Antony committed suicide by falling on his own sword. He had suffered serious desertions among his troops the day before during the Battle of Alexandria and, despite an early victory, the desertions proved too much and he was ultimately defeated. After returning to Alexandria, he received false information that his wife, Cleopatra VII, had already taken her own life.

    After he stabbed himself he was told she wasn’t really dead, and he was taken to her where she was in hiding with her ladies in her mausoleum. Unfortunately the doors were barred and the dying man had to be hauled up to her through a window. He survived for only a few minutes after he reached her, and died in Cleopatra’s arms.

    Cleopatra herself would take her own life eleven days later, and their three children were taken to Rome to be raised by Antony’s third wife, Octavia. With Cleopatra’s death, and the subsequent murder of her eldest son, Caesarion, Egypt became a Roman Province.

    — 18 hours ago with 256 notes
    medieval-women:

A forensic facial reconstruction of Marfa Sobakina - Third wife of Ivan IV (Ivan the Terrible) and Tzarina of All Russia.
Born 1552 – Died 1571
The beautiful merchant’s daughter was chosen from amongst 12 marriage finalists to become the wife of Ivan the Terrible. Soon after her selection, Marfa was afflicted by a mysterious illness. She became weak and lost weight rapidly. Barely able to stand, Marfa married Ivan in 1571 but died just two weeks later.
Ivan was devastated and Marfa’s death increased his paranoia and mistrust. Suspecting his wife was poisoned, he had several of his loyal subjects executed.
It is believed that the actual cause of Marfa’s death was a potion supplied by her mother to increase her fertility.
Wiki
internetstones.com

    medieval-women:

    A forensic facial reconstruction of Marfa Sobakina - Third wife of Ivan IV (Ivan the Terrible) and Tzarina of All Russia.

    Born 1552 – Died 1571

    The beautiful merchant’s daughter was chosen from amongst 12 marriage finalists to become the wife of Ivan the Terrible. Soon after her selection, Marfa was afflicted by a mysterious illness. She became weak and lost weight rapidly. Barely able to stand, Marfa married Ivan in 1571 but died just two weeks later.

    Ivan was devastated and Marfa’s death increased his paranoia and mistrust. Suspecting his wife was poisoned, he had several of his loyal subjects executed.

    It is believed that the actual cause of Marfa’s death was a potion supplied by her mother to increase her fertility.

    Wiki

    internetstones.com

    (via thecreativehistorian)

    — 19 hours ago with 26 notes
    dcnedehaan:


MYTHOLOGY MEME: [1/2] mythological objects: The Holy Grail

The Holy Grail first appears as simply “a grail” in the works of Chrétien de Troyes. The word is probably derived from the Old French word graal meaning a “broad and capacious dish or salver”. Though usually thought of as being a cup or chalice, the Grail has indeed been variously described as a platter, dish, a cornucopia, horn of plenty or even a book or a stone.
The quest for a divine vessel was a popular theme in Arthurian legend long before medieval writers introduced the Holy Grail to British mythology. It is said that Arthur and his warriors sailed off to the Celtic Otherworld to capture the pearl-rimmed Cauldron of Annwfn: like the grail it was a giver of plenty, but also of prophecy. It was at last discovered at Caer-Siddi (or Wydyr), an island bound castle of glass, where it was guarded by nine divine maidens; but the ensuing perils were too much for even Arthur’s men. The mission was abandoned and only seven of their number returned home.

    dcnedehaan:

    MYTHOLOGY MEME: [1/2] mythological objects: The Holy Grail

    The Holy Grail first appears as simply “a grail” in the works of Chrétien de Troyes. The word is probably derived from the Old French word graal meaning a “broad and capacious dish or salver”. Though usually thought of as being a cup or chalice, the Grail has indeed been variously described as a platter, dish, a cornucopia, horn of plenty or even a book or a stone.

    The quest for a divine vessel was a popular theme in Arthurian legend long before medieval writers introduced the Holy Grail to British mythology. It is said that Arthur and his warriors sailed off to the Celtic Otherworld to capture the pearl-rimmed Cauldron of Annwfn: like the grail it was a giver of plenty, but also of prophecy. It was at last discovered at Caer-Siddi (or Wydyr), an island bound castle of glass, where it was guarded by nine divine maidens; but the ensuing perils were too much for even Arthur’s men. The mission was abandoned and only seven of their number returned home.

    (via stardust-pond)

    — 1 day ago with 112 notes
    theeconomist:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

    theeconomist:

    Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

    (via florenceandthenightingale)

    — 1 day ago with 958 notes
    marthajefferson:

The World’s Oldest Crown 
The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time. 
(source)

    marthajefferson:

    The World’s Oldest Crown

    The crown was discovered in a remote cave in the Judaean Desert near the Dead Sea in 1961 among hundreds of other objects from the period. Known as the ‘Nahal Mishar Hoard’, more than 400 objects were discovered by Pessah Bar-Adon and his fellow Israeli archaeologists in the cave which became known as the ‘Cave of the Treasure’. The ancient relic, which dates back to the Copper Age between 4000–3300 B.C., is shaped like a thick ring and features vultures and doors protruding from the top. It is believed the crown played a part in burial ceremonies for people of importance at the time.

    (source)

    (via stardust-pond)

    — 1 day ago with 3362 notes

    congressarchives:

    225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

    The First Congress faced many of the same issues as the Confederation Congress had under the Articles of Confederation. One of those issues was where the U.S. capital city would be located. The Confederation Congress voted in 1784 to move to capital to Trenton, New Jersey. However, the capital was never moved from New York City because they could not secure the required votes to appropriate the money to build the new city along the Delaware River.

    At the start of the First Congress, the question was still highly contested. Some members wanted the federal city to be located along the Delaware River while others wanted the city further south along the Potomac River.

    On July 24, 1789, this petition was sent to Congress by citizens of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Organized by John Cox, the petition outlined 13 reasons the district should be located in their 10 square miles along the Delaware River. He cited a victorious Revolutionary War battle near the location to exemplify its defensibility, and continued by listing the advantages of the land itself. Not only did his location have the best fishing, timber, stone for building, and wildlife, but it even had the “cheapest and best of all manure, The Plaster of Paris” to use as fertilizer. As if that was not enough, the land would be “capable of supplying wood, as well for fuel as for other purposes, by water to the end of time.

    Congress continued to debate the issue until it passed the Residence Act in 1790, which established the temporary and permanent seat of the federal government.

    Petition of John Cox and Others in Support of the Establishment of the Permanent Seat of the Government on the Delaware River, Sen 1A-G2, 7/24/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate

    (via lordozner)

    — 1 day ago with 110 notes
    tiny-librarian:

Alexandra of Denmark with her eldest daughter„ Louise, Princess Royal.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    Alexandra of Denmark with her eldest daughter„ Louise, Princess Royal.

    Source

    — 2 days ago with 39 notes
    12 Eerie Photos Of World War I Blended With The Present, 100 Years On →

    brightonmuseums-ww1-war-stories:

    Then and now photos relating to the First World War, including our very own Royal Pavilion.

    If you like blending the past with the present, look out for our Tales of the Pavilion Hospital website in a couple of months…

    — 2 days ago with 1 note

    disneyvillainsforjustice:

    -teesa-:

    7.23.14

    George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

    "Another scene I remember now as an adult is every morning at school we started the day with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag…there was the American flag flying over the camp but I could also see the barbed wire fence and the sentry towers pointing at us from my schoolhouse window as I recited the words ‘With liberty and justice for all’." - George Takei, The Daily Show (July 24, 2014). 

    Full Episode (apologies, The Daily Show website does not have the best video player). 

    To Be Takei documentary official website. 

    - Mod Dawes Sr. 

    (via imnotinthefruitbusiness)

    — 2 days ago with 97274 notes

    nightwatch-official:

    geekygothgirl:

    gorgonetta:

    [Painting of Death as a spectral nanny taking a child and infant away from their bereaved family.  A detail shows the family’s house number is 1918.]

    I never realized this until seeing the detail, but this painting is most likely about the flu pandemic.

    it’s really interesting seeing death portrayed as a woman 

    (Source: ex0skeletal, via aine-is-awesome)

    — 2 days ago with 221718 notes
    #art 

    WOMEN WHO WERE GREATER THAN THE MEN THEY STOOD BEHIND Anne Boleyn


    Anne Boleyn was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of King Henry VIII and Marquess of Pembroke in her own right. Anne was initially appointed lady-in-waiting to Henry VIII’s wife Catherine. Her striking looks and sophisticated manners charmed Henry who had by then grown tired of his wife, as she had failed to produce a male heir and decided to pursue Anne instead. Although she resisted Henry VIII’s advances, by 1533 Anne was pregnant with her first child. Henry broke from Catholic church by marrying Anne in a secret ceremony in January 1533. Two more pregnancies ended in miscarriage, in the summer of 1534 and in January 1536. When Henry discovered the second baby had been a boy, he became convinced the marriage was cursed. Henry was still desperate for a male heir and he blamed Anne for this misfortune. On 2 May 1536 Anne was arrested on charges of adultery with five men including her own brother, Lord George Rochford. On 19th May Anne was led from her quarters to Tower Green where, spared the axe, she was granted the ‘mercy’ of beheading by a French swordsman. Anne was the first English queen to be publicly executed.

    (via thehouseofborgia)

    — 3 days ago with 1111 notes

    artschoolglasses:

    Queen Victoria

    b. May 24, 1819, d. Jan 22, 1901

    (via gimmetea)

    — 3 days ago with 1340 notes