Geeking Out Over History

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Random facts that will probably only interest the blogmistress.
Includes posts from all eras of history. Although the blogmistress is currently suffering with an unhealthy interest with the English monarchs of the 15th century!

(Sister site: http://fangirl-ramblings.tumblr.com)



twitter.com/Louise2212:

    
The Duke of York (later King George VI) with his daughters, Princesses Margaret and Elizabeth.

    The Duke of York (later King George VI) with his daughters, Princesses Margaret and Elizabeth.

    (Source: royallymonroe, via gimmetea)

    — 3 hours ago with 49 notes
    tiny-librarian:

The mummy of Queen Tiye, the Great Royal Wife of Amenhotep III and mother of Akhenaten.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    The mummy of Queen Tiye, the Great Royal Wife of Amenhotep III and mother of Akhenaten.

    Source

    — 11 hours ago with 46 notes
    tsarevnamaria:

HIM Tsar Nicholas II with his wife, Alexandra Feodorovna, and sister-in-law Grand Duchess Elisabeth Feodorovna (in her nun habit), accompanied by TIH Grand Duchesses Maria, Anastasia, Olga and Tatiana Nikolaevna around 1915. 
Thank you to Tatiana Z for the photo ♥ Love you dear

    tsarevnamaria:

    HIM Tsar Nicholas II with his wife, Alexandra Feodorovna, and sister-in-law Grand Duchess Elisabeth Feodorovna (in her nun habit), accompanied by TIH Grand Duchesses Maria, Anastasia, Olga and Tatiana Nikolaevna around 1915.

    Thank you to Tatiana Z for the photo ♥ Love you dear

    (via tiny-librarian)

    — 1 day ago with 107 notes
    edwardslovelyelizabeth:

On this day in history, 29 September 1464, Edward IV officially introduced Elizabeth Woodville to the Royal Council as his wife and Queen of England.
Ever since Edward’s coronation the question of the royal succession had been discussed. As the time went on more and more pressure was put on the king to find a suitable bride. Matters came to head in September 1464, when the king attended a meeting of the Royal Council, in Reading. The question of his marriage was discussed and this forced the king to inform the Council that he had already secretly married Elizabeth Woodville, a commoner. On St. Michael’s day, 29 September 1464, Elizabeth was introduced to the Royal Council and acknowledged by all present as Queen of England. She was eventually crowned at Westminster Abbey on 26 May 1465. Elizabeth Woodville’s greatest legacy was perhaps the great number of her female descendants who became queens. Her daughter Elizabeth of York married Henry VII, was Queen of England and was the mother of not only Henry VIII, but also Margaret, later wife of the King of Scotland, and Mary, later wife of the King of France; Woodville’s great-granddaughters included Queen Mary I and the enormously significant Queen Elizabeth I; her great-great-granddaughters included Mary, Queen of Scots and Lady Jane Grey, who ruled England for nine days in July 1553. 
Pictured: King Edward IV and his Queen, Elizabeth Woodville, at Reading Abbey (1464), painted by Ernest Board (1923). The painting depicts King Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, on Michaelmass Day, 1464, at Reading Abbey, Edward is greeting his wife, before placing her in the chair of estate in the chancel of the Abbey Church. Queen Elizabeth’s trainbearers are her two sons, Thomas and Richard Grey. Behind the Queen stand the Earl of Warwick, cousin to the King and on his left is the Duke of Clarence, the King’s younger brother. In the right-hand corner is Richard Woodville, the Queen’s father. To the extreme left stands the Abbot, John Thorne I.

    edwardslovelyelizabeth:

    On this day in history, 29 September 1464, Edward IV officially introduced Elizabeth Woodville to the Royal Council as his wife and Queen of England.

    Ever since Edward’s coronation the question of the royal succession had been discussed. As the time went on more and more pressure was put on the king to find a suitable bride. Matters came to head in September 1464, when the king attended a meeting of the Royal Council, in Reading. The question of his marriage was discussed and this forced the king to inform the Council that he had already secretly married Elizabeth Woodville, a commoner. On St. Michael’s day, 29 September 1464, Elizabeth was introduced to the Royal Council and acknowledged by all present as Queen of England. She was eventually crowned at Westminster Abbey on 26 May 1465. Elizabeth Woodville’s greatest legacy was perhaps the great number of her female descendants who became queens. Her daughter Elizabeth of York married Henry VII, was Queen of England and was the mother of not only Henry VIII, but also Margaret, later wife of the King of Scotland, and Mary, later wife of the King of France; Woodville’s great-granddaughters included Queen Mary I and the enormously significant Queen Elizabeth I; her great-great-granddaughters included Mary, Queen of Scots and Lady Jane Grey, who ruled England for nine days in July 1553.

    Pictured: King Edward IV and his Queen, Elizabeth Woodville, at Reading Abbey (1464), painted by Ernest Board (1923). The painting depicts King Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville, on Michaelmass Day, 1464, at Reading Abbey, Edward is greeting his wife, before placing her in the chair of estate in the chancel of the Abbey Church. Queen Elizabeth’s trainbearers are her two sons, Thomas and Richard Grey. Behind the Queen stand the Earl of Warwick, cousin to the King and on his left is the Duke of Clarence, the King’s younger brother. In the right-hand corner is Richard Woodville, the Queen’s father. To the extreme left stands the Abbot, John Thorne I.

    (via houseplantagenet)

    — 1 day ago with 189 notes
    #edward IV  #king of england  #elizabeth woodville  #queen consort of england 

    HBICs of history » Mary, queen of Scots

    Mary became queen when her father, James V died, six days after her birth. She was sent by her mother, Mary of Guise, to be raised at the court of the French king Henry II and was married in 1558 to his son Francis II. After Francis’s brief rule as king ended with his premature death, Mary returned to Scotland (1561), where she was distrusted because of her Catholic upbringing. In 1565 the red-haired queen married her ambitious cousin Henry Stewart, Lord Darnley, and became a victim of intrigues among the Scottish nobles. After the birth of her son James (later James I of England), Mary was estranged from Darnley, who was murdered in 1567. Ignoring objections by the jealous Scottish nobility, she married James Hepburn, earl of Bothwell, a suspect in Darnley’s murder. The rebellious nobles forced her to abdicate in favour of her son. After failed attempts to win back the throne, she sought refuge in England with her cousin Elizabeth I, who arranged to keep her in captivity. Several uprisings by English Catholics in Mary’s favour convinced Elizabeth to have Mary tried and condemned; she was beheaded in 1587.

    (Source: ashlynlily, via thehistoricalsociety)

    — 1 day ago with 225 notes

    history meme  [favourite women in history] —>  Isabel Neville

    Lady Isabel Neville (5 September 1451 – 22 December 1476) was the elder daughter of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (theKingmaker of the Wars of the Roses), and Anne de Beauchamp, 16th Countess of Warwick. She was the wife of George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence. She was also the elder sister of Anne Neville.

    Isabel Neville was born at Warwick Castle, the seat of the Earls of Warwick. In 1469, her ambitious father betrothed her to England’s heir presumptive, George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence, the brother of both King Edward IV and Richard, Duke of Gloucester(later Richard III). The king opposed the marriage as it would bring the already powerful Earl of Warwick too close to the throne. The ceremony however took place in secret at Calais on 11 July 1469, conducted by Isabel Neville’s Uncle George Neville, archbishop of York. Following their marriage Clarence joined forces with Warwick and traitorously allied with the Lancastrians led by Margaret of Anjou, queen consort to Henry VI. After Isabel Neville’s sister Anne was married to Edward of Westminster, Prince of Wales, the son and heir of Henry VI, Clarence rejoined his brother, realizing that it was now unlikely that he would become king.

    Isabel Neville died on 22 December 1476, two and a half months after the birth of Richard. It is now thought the cause was either consumption or childbed fever, yet at the time her husband accused one of her ladies-in-waiting of having murdered her, and committed in his turn a notorious judicial murder of the lady, called Ankarette Twynyho. Ankarette’s grandson Roger Twynyho received from Edward IV a full retrospective pardon for Ankarette, and the petition he submitted to the king in 1478 describes fully the circumstances of the case, well illustrating the quasi-kingly high-handedness of Clarence which was ultimately not tolerated by the king

    (Source: marquise-de-pompadour, via bethwoodvilles)

    — 2 days ago with 119 notes
    thesixthduke:

tiny-librarian:

The last portrait that Henry VIII posed for is thought to have been identified in a stately home where it has been hanging for more than 300 years.
The oil painting, which was created on an oak panel, has been hanging in a stately home in Wiltshire for more than 300 years with little clue as to its origins.
However, the value of the portrait jumped from a mere £10,000 to more than £1 million after experts examining tree rings in the panel discovered they could be dated to before the king died in 1547.
The painting was previously thought to be a portrait of the king painted after his death. Now, after thorough scientific examination of the oak, experts believe Henry VIII may have posed for an unknown artist in 1544, three years before his death. The wood is believed to date back to 1529.
The painting has an inscription on it stating that it was painted when the Monarch was aged 54, in the 36th year of his reign, but it was common for information to be placed on later copies.
But a closer look at the inscription showed it had been added at the same time the portrait was created.
It will now be moved to a glass case in a different area of Longleat House in Wiltshire where it had been display to visitors for much of the year.
Source/Read More

.

    thesixthduke:

    tiny-librarian:

    The last portrait that Henry VIII posed for is thought to have been identified in a stately home where it has been hanging for more than 300 years.

    The oil painting, which was created on an oak panel, has been hanging in a stately home in Wiltshire for more than 300 years with little clue as to its origins.

    However, the value of the portrait jumped from a mere £10,000 to more than £1 million after experts examining tree rings in the panel discovered they could be dated to before the king died in 1547.

    The painting was previously thought to be a portrait of the king painted after his death. Now, after thorough scientific examination of the oak, experts believe Henry VIII may have posed for an unknown artist in 1544, three years before his death. The wood is believed to date back to 1529.

    The painting has an inscription on it stating that it was painted when the Monarch was aged 54, in the 36th year of his reign, but it was common for information to be placed on later copies.

    But a closer look at the inscription showed it had been added at the same time the portrait was created.

    It will now be moved to a glass case in a different area of Longleat House in Wiltshire where it had been display to visitors for much of the year.

    Source/Read More

    .

    (via stardust-pond)

    — 2 days ago with 322 notes
    The White Boar of Gloucester and The Bear and Ragged Staff of Warwick

    King Richard III & Queen Anne Neville’s livery badges | insp

    (Source: stardust-pond, via stardust-pond)

    — 3 days ago with 42 notes
    #livery badges  #richard earl of warwick  #richard duke of gloucester  #richard iii 
    tiny-librarian:


The Daughters of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, a wall-painting from the ‘King’s House’ at Tell el-Amarna, c.1345–1335 BC.

The girls depicted in the corner are their fourth and fifth daughters, Neferneferure and Neferneferuaten Tasherit. I’ve never seen the full version of this, it’s usually cropped just to show the girls, and it’s really cool to be able to see at least parts of the other family members. I can only imagine what it looked like complete.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    The Daughters of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, a wall-painting from the ‘King’s House’ at Tell el-Amarna, c.1345–1335 BC.

    The girls depicted in the corner are their fourth and fifth daughters, Neferneferure and Neferneferuaten Tasherit. I’ve never seen the full version of this, it’s usually cropped just to show the girls, and it’s really cool to be able to see at least parts of the other family members. I can only imagine what it looked like complete.

    Source

    — 3 days ago with 42 notes
    historicaltimes:

A Heinkel He111 bomber over the London Docks, taken from another German bomber at the beginning of the London Blitz, 7th September 1940 -
Read More

    historicaltimes:

    A Heinkel He111 bomber over the London Docks, taken from another German bomber at the beginning of the London Blitz, 7th September 1940 -

    Read More

    (via gimmetea)

    — 4 days ago with 461 notes
    Belfast's Berlin Wall →

    historical-nonfiction:

    Belfast is criss-crossed with walls and gates, which close at nights and on weekends. Houses near the walls have metal bars on the windows to guard against the rocks and bottles occasionally thrown over. Colorful murals and graffiti cover the walls. But they are a stark reminder of a city still…

    (Source: dangerous-business.com)

    — 4 days ago with 138 notes

    congressarchives:

    225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

    On June 8, 1789, Representative James Madison introduced a series of proposed amendments to the newly ratified U.S. Constitution. That summer the House of Representatives debated Madison’s proposal, and on August 24 the House passed 17 amendments to be added to the Constitution. Those 17 amendments were then sent to the Senate.

    On September 2, the Senate began considering amendments to the Constitutions as proposed and passed in the House. The Senate compiled this document over six days. The Senate’s debate continued for another two days and resulted in additional changes to the amendments not shown on this document.

    On September 25, Congress passed 12 amendments that were sent to the states for approval. Ten of the amendments were ratified by the required three-fourths of the states and became part of the Constitution in 1791. These first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights.

    Notes Recording Senate Consideration of House Proposed Articles of Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 9/2/1789, SEN1A-C2, Records of the U.S. Senate

    (via todaysdocument)

    — 5 days ago with 131 notes

    shewolfofengland:

    The Kings of England (since the Conquest), Game of Thrones style. | Part 3/6 

    (via stardust-pond)

    — 5 days ago with 148 notes
    athens-archaeological-museum:

Chous, with Paris and Helen? with an Eros between them (Late 5th century BC, Athens)

    athens-archaeological-museum:

    Chous, with Paris and Helen? with an Eros between them (Late 5th century BC, Athens)

    (Source: national-archaeological-museum, via thecreativehistorian)

    — 5 days ago with 106 notes

    jeannepompadour:

    Illustrations from the Chronica Majora by Matthew Paris, compiled between 1240 and 1253

    (via thecreativehistorian)

    — 6 days ago with 112 notes