Geeking Out Over History

Any requests?   Random facts that will probably only interest the blogmistress
Includes posts from all eras of history | Although the blogmistress is currently suffering with an unhealthy interest with the English monarchs of the 15th century!

twitter.com/Louise2212:

    queensofias:

    King George VI and Queen Elizabeth with their daughters Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, photographed on 15 December 1936. 

    On 11 December, following the abdication of King Edward VIII, the Duke of York was proclaimed Sovereign, as King George VI. Realising that there would be a demand for photographs of the new Royal Family, not just at home but worldwide, a sitting was booked with Adams for four days after the accession.

    (via gimmetea)

    — 1 hour ago with 55 notes
    #Royal familes  #George VI  #Elizabeth II 
    vivelareine:


I cannot say enough of the goodness that she showed to me, which ended only with her life. She considered me and cared for me as her daughter, and I, I honoured her as a second mother and vowed to her all those feelings. It was said that we resembled each other in face: I feel that I have her nature; would that I might have all her virtues and rejoin her some day, also my father and mother, in the bosom of God, where, I doubt not, they are now enjoying the reward of a death so meritorious.

—Marie Thérèse Charlotte on her aunt, Madame Elisabeth
[image: Madame Elisabeth being separated from her niece. 19th century engraving. via my scan/collection]

    vivelareine:

    I cannot say enough of the goodness that she showed to me, which ended only with her life. She considered me and cared for me as her daughter, and I, I honoured her as a second mother and vowed to her all those feelings. It was said that we resembled each other in face: I feel that I have her nature; would that I might have all her virtues and rejoin her some day, also my father and mother, in the bosom of God, where, I doubt not, they are now enjoying the reward of a death so meritorious.

    —Marie Thérèse Charlotte on her aunt, Madame Elisabeth

    [image: Madame Elisabeth being separated from her niece. 19th century engraving. via my scan/collection]

    (via tiny-librarian)

    — 11 hours ago with 49 notes

    Cartimandua was a 1st-century queen of the Brigantes, a Celtic people living in what is now northern England. She came to power around the time of the Roman conquest of Britain, and formed a large tribal agglomeration that became loyal to Rome. She appears to have been widely influential in early Roman Britain.

    Our only knowledge of Cartimandua is through the writings of Roman author Tacitus, who presents her in a negative light. He writes of her treacherous role in the capture of Caratacus, who had sought her protection, her “self-indulgence, her sexual impropriety in rejecting her husband in favour of a common soldier, and her “cunning strategems” during her rule. However, he also consistently names her as a queen, the only one such known in early Roman Britain.

    Boudica was ruler of the Iceni people, a Celtic tribe, who led an uprising against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire. In AD 60 or 61, while the Roman governor Gaius Paulinus was leading a campaign on the island of Anglesey off the northwest coast of Wales, Boudica led the Iceni as well as the Trinovantes and others in revolt.

    Boudica led 100,000 Iceni, Trinovantes and others to fight the Roman Legio IX Hispana and burned and destroyed several settlements in Britannia. An estimated 70,000–80,000 Romans and British were killed in the three cities by those led by Boudica. The crisis caused the Emperor Nero to consider withdrawing all Roman forces from Britain, but Suetonius’s eventual victory over Boudica confirmed Roman control of the province. Boudica’s fate is not known.

    The two women are the only known female Celtic rulers of the age.

    (Source: apriki, via thehistoricalsociety)

    — 16 hours ago with 692 notes
    theimperialcourt:

A veteran of the Battle of Waterloo with his wife, 1850

    theimperialcourt:

    A veteran of the Battle of Waterloo with his wife, 1850

    — 21 hours ago with 495 notes
    inspiringdresses:

Wedding Dress in 3 parts, 1742, BritishMFA


Wedding dress worn by Mary Beck at her marriage to Nathaniel Carter, Newburyport, Massachusetts, September 1, 1742 in Newbury, MA (U.S.A).

    inspiringdresses:

    Wedding Dress in 3 parts, 1742, British
    MFA

    Wedding dress worn by Mary Beck at her marriage to Nathaniel Carter, Newburyport, Massachusetts, September 1, 1742 in Newbury, MA (U.S.A).

    — 1 day ago with 89 notes
    #18th century  #fashion  #wedding dress 
    suchasensualdestroyer:

Photo of a Sikh soldier (India) c. 1860/70.

    suchasensualdestroyer:

    Photo of a Sikh soldier (India) c. 1860/70.

    (via lordozner)

    — 1 day ago with 24 notes
    historysquee:

Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, son of George V
By Lafayette (Lafayette Ltd)
Bromide print, 1902

    historysquee:

    Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, son of George V

    By Lafayette (Lafayette Ltd)

    Bromide print, 1902

    — 1 day ago with 18 notes
    #Henry  #Duke of Gloucester  #Family of George V 
    Undergarments belonging to Queen Elizabeth ISource: [x]

    Undergarments belonging to Queen Elizabeth I

    Source: [x]

    — 1 day ago with 13 notes
    #Elizabeth I  #Queen of England  #16th century  #fashion  #underwear 

    tiny-librarian:

    fuckyeahhouseofhanover:

    tiny-librarian:

    Queens of Hanover married to members of the House of Hanover:

    Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of George III: October 12th, 1814 - November 17th, 1818

    Caroline of Brunswick, wife of George IV: January 29th, 1820 - August 7th, 1821

    Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, wife of William IV: June 26th, 1830 - June 20th, 1837

    Frederica of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of Ernest Augustus I: June 20th, 1837 - June 29th, 1841

    Marie of Saxe-Altenburg, wife of George V: November 18th, 1851 - September 20th, 1866

    Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz: mixed race kween

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_of_Mecklenburg-Strelitz#Ancestry

    Barely. The possible African ancestry (And they’re not even sure of that) would be from her 16X great grandmother. It’s negligible at that point really.

    — 2 days ago with 54 notes
    royalwatcher:

Princess Elizabeth, on her 16th birthday on April 21, 1942, reviews the Grenadier guards, the most senior regiment of British infantry. She was appointed as the Colonel-in-Chief as part of her expanding royal duties.

    royalwatcher:

    Princess Elizabeth, on her 16th birthday on April 21, 1942, reviews the Grenadier guards, the most senior regiment of British infantry. She was appointed as the Colonel-in-Chief as part of her expanding royal duties.

    (via gimmetea)

    — 2 days ago with 276 notes
    tiny-librarian:

On April 7th, 1853, Leopold George Duncan Albert, future Duke of Albany was born. He was the eighth child and fourth son born to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Queen Victoria elected to use chloroform during her labour for the first time, thus sanctioning the use of anaesthesia in childbirth.

    tiny-librarian:

    On April 7th, 1853, Leopold George Duncan Albert, future Duke of Albany was born. He was the eighth child and fourth son born to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Queen Victoria elected to use chloroform during her labour for the first time, thus sanctioning the use of anaesthesia in childbirth.

    — 2 days ago with 28 notes

    jeannepompadour:

    Christina of Saxony Queen of Denmark, Norway and Sweden with her daughter-in-law Elizabeth and daughter Elizabeth as depicted on an altarpiece by Claus Berg, c. 1530

    (via lordozner)

    — 2 days ago with 21 notes
    mediumaevum:

The Chapel Bridge is the oldest covered wooden bridge in Europe and one of the most visited sites in Switzerland. Built in the 14th century, it was originally part of the defense system of the city of Lucerne. 
Next to the bridge and part of the old city wall, is the old wasserturm or water tower. This medieval brick building has served as a prison, torture chamber, watchtower, and treasury building and is the most frequently photographed monument in Switzerland.

    mediumaevum:

    The Chapel Bridge is the oldest covered wooden bridge in Europe and one of the most visited sites in Switzerland. Built in the 14th century, it was originally part of the defense system of the city of Lucerne. 

    Next to the bridge and part of the old city wall, is the old wasserturm or water tower. This medieval brick building has served as a prison, torture chamber, watchtower, and treasury building and is the most frequently photographed monument in Switzerland.

    (Source: magellans.com, via lordozner)

    — 2 days ago with 328 notes

    Prince George of Cambridge arrives in New Zealand at Wellington Airport on April 7, 2014 in Wellington, New Zealand.

    (Source: causeallkindsoftrouble, via just-anotherr-fangirl)

    — 3 days ago with 1661 notes