Geeking Out Over History

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Random facts that will probably only interest the blogmistress.
Includes posts from all eras of history. Although the blogmistress is currently suffering with an unhealthy interest with the English monarchs of the 15th century!

(Sister site: http://fangirl-ramblings.tumblr.com)



twitter.com/Louise2212:

    bethwoodvilles:

    Queens of England + Matilda of Boulogne (1105-1152)

    Matilda of Boulogne was born in 1105 in Boulogne, France. Her parents were Eustace III, Count of Boulogne and Mary, daughter of Malcolm III of Scotland and Saint Margaret, making Matilda the first cousin of her husband’s rival, Empress Matilda. 

    She married Stephen of Blois, Count of Mortain, in 1125. Stephen already held large estates in England and combined with what Matilda inherited they became one of the wealthiest couples in the country. After her father’s death the same year of her marriage, Matilda became suo jure Countess of Boulogne but she and Stephen ruled jointly. During the reign of Henry I, the count and countess had two children, a son, Baldwin, and a daughter, Matilda. Both died young.

    On the death of Henry I in 1135, Stephen took advantage of Boulogne’s seaports and rushed to England. He beat his rival, Empress Matilda, and was crowned king. Matilda was heavily pregnant at the time and crossed the Channel after giving birth to a son, Eustace, who would eventually succeed her as Count of Boulogne. Matilda was crowned queen on Easter, March 22, 1136.

    During the civil war known as the Anarchy, Matilda was her husband’s strongest supporter. When England was invaded in 1138, she called troops from Boulogne and Flanders, besieged Dover Castle, and went north to Durham where she made a treaty with David I of Scotland in 1139. 

    When Stephen was captured in February 1141, she played a critical role in keeping the king’s cause alive. She generated sympathy and support from Stephen’s most loyal followers and raised an army with the help of William of Ypres. While Empress Matilda was waiting in London to prepare her coronation, Matilda and Stephen’s brother, Henry of Blois, chased her out of the city. Empress Matilda then besieged Henry of Blois at Winchester, causing Matilda to command her army to attack the besiegers. Her army captured the Empress’s half-brother, Robert of Gloucester. The two Matildas attempted negotiation but neither was willing to compromise. They ended up simply exchanging Robert and the king. Stephen began re-establishing his authority and he and Matilda both had a fresh coronation at Christmas 1141.

    It should be significant that during their marriage, Stephen had no illegitimate children. Considering this and Matilda’s actions during the Anarchy, it’s said that the couple had great devotion for each other.

    Matilda died in May 1152 of a fever and was buried at Faversham Abbey which she and her husband founded. (x)

    (via houseplantagenet)

    — 16 minutes ago with 160 notes

    jeannepompadour:

    Illustrations from the Chronica Majora by Matthew Paris, compiled between 1240 and 1253

    (via lordozner)

    — 16 hours ago with 105 notes
    get to know me meme (royalist edition) || (02/10) monarchs: Empress Matilda

    Matilda of England or perhaps more commonly known as Empress Matilda (7 February 1102 – 10 September 1167), was the only daughter and the oldest of King Henry I of England and Matilda of Scotland’s two children. Her younger brother William Adelin’s untimely death in the White Ship disaster of 1120 left Henry I without an heir and therefore he designated Matilda his heir.

    As a child, Matilda was betrothed and, in 1114, married to the future Holy Roman Emperor, Henry V. They were crowned in 1116 and Matilda became Empress. The couple had no children and Henry died in 1125. As the heir to the English throne, Matilda couldn’t remain childless and in 1127, her father began to formally look for a new husband for his daughter. He found the 13-year-old Geoffrey of Anjou (Matilda was 25) and they were married in 1128. This marriage produced three sons, Henry, Geoffrey and William.

    Upon the death of her father in England in 1135, Matilda was in Normandy and pregnant with her third son, leaving the English throne to be usurped by her cousin, Stephen of Blois. The rivalry between Matilda and Stephen led to years of civil war and unrest in England – a period later known as The Anarchy – which eventually ended with Stephen agreeing to name Matilda’s oldest son, Henry (later Henry II), his successor.

    In theory, Matilda was the first female ruler of England despite being left out of the history books by many. The reason being that during her short-lived reign in 1141, Matilda was never crowed nor did she manage to consolidate her rule, instead assuming the title “Lady of the English”. She never stopped campaigning for her and her son’s rightful claim to the throne and did live to see Henry II ascend to the throne in 1154.

    (via thecreativehistorian)

    — 1 day ago with 276 notes

    tiny-librarian:

    On this day in history, September 1st, in 1715, the reign of the infamous Sun King came to an end.

    Louis XIV, who had been King of France for 72 years and 110 days, died of gangrene at the Palace of Versailles, four days before he would have turned 77. He left as his heir his five year old great grandson, who would reign as Louis XV.

    Louis XIV’s reign still stands as the longest of any monarch of a major country in European history.

    — 1 day ago with 189 notes

    King Richard III and Queen Anne
    at  Cardiff Castle  in South Wales

    (Source: izzyknopes, via stardust-pond)

    — 1 day ago with 85 notes
    historysquee:

Princess Beatrice of Battenberg, daughter of Queen Victoria
By William George Lacy
Albumen carte-de-visite, circa 1861

    historysquee:

    Princess Beatrice of Battenberg, daughter of Queen Victoria

    By William George Lacy

    Albumen carte-de-visite, circa 1861

    — 2 days ago with 82 notes
    #princess beatrice  #children of queen victoria 
    coolchicksfromhistory:

Christine de Pizan (1364- c. 1430)
Art by April Babcock (tumblr)
Christine de Pizan is one of the best known writers of the medieval period, yet if not for circumstances beyond her control she might never have picked up a pen.  The daughter of an Italian scientist at the court of Charles V of France, Christine was given a classical education before her marriage at the age of fifteen to a royal secretary named Etienne du Castel.  When she was 25, her beloved husband died in an epidemic.  As her father had already passed away, Christine found herself responsible for the care of not only herself and her two children, but also her mother and an orphaned niece.
Christine began writing love ballads that caught the attention of wealthy patrons who enjoyed both her poetry and the novelty of a female writer.  Christine wrote hundreds of poems, many on commission for specific nobles, and this work allowed her to support her family and clear the debts left after her husband’s death.
Christine’s most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), is an impassioned defense of women.  It challenged misogyny by creating a symbolic city of righteous women.  The women profiled include historical figures such as Zenobia and Sappho, pagan goddesses such as Isis and Minerva, women from the Hebrew Bible such as Deborah and the unnamed Woman of Valor (Proverbs 31), and Christian saints such as the Virgin Mary and St. Lucy.  Christine’s book was a testimony to the accomplishments of women and argued for wider access to education for women. 
While The Book of the City of Ladies is primarily about female achievement, Christine also included an anti-rape message.  As a character in the book, Christine says “I am therefore troubled and grieved when men argue that many women want to be raped and that it does not bother them at all to be raped by men even when they verbally protest…”  Lady Rectitude, one of Christine’s guides in The Book of the City of Ladies, responds “Rest assured, dear friend, chaste ladies who live honestly take absolutely no pleasure in being raped. Indeed, rape is the greatest possible sorrow for them. Many upright women have demonstrated that this is true with their own credible examples…”
In 1418, Christine retired to a convent in Poissy.  At the convent she wrote one final poem which she dedicated to Joan of Arc.  It is the only known French language work about Joan of Arc written during Joan’s lifetime.

    coolchicksfromhistory:

    Christine de Pizan (1364- c. 1430)

    Art by April Babcock (tumblr)

    Christine de Pizan is one of the best known writers of the medieval period, yet if not for circumstances beyond her control she might never have picked up a pen.  The daughter of an Italian scientist at the court of Charles V of France, Christine was given a classical education before her marriage at the age of fifteen to a royal secretary named Etienne du Castel.  When she was 25, her beloved husband died in an epidemic.  As her father had already passed away, Christine found herself responsible for the care of not only herself and her two children, but also her mother and an orphaned niece.

    Christine began writing love ballads that caught the attention of wealthy patrons who enjoyed both her poetry and the novelty of a female writer.  Christine wrote hundreds of poems, many on commission for specific nobles, and this work allowed her to support her family and clear the debts left after her husband’s death.

    Christine’s most famous work, The Book of the City of Ladies (1405), is an impassioned defense of women.  It challenged misogyny by creating a symbolic city of righteous women.  The women profiled include historical figures such as Zenobia and Sappho, pagan goddesses such as Isis and Minerva, women from the Hebrew Bible such as Deborah and the unnamed Woman of Valor (Proverbs 31), and Christian saints such as the Virgin Mary and St. Lucy.  Christine’s book was a testimony to the accomplishments of women and argued for wider access to education for women. 

    While The Book of the City of Ladies is primarily about female achievement, Christine also included an anti-rape message.  As a character in the book, Christine says “I am therefore troubled and grieved when men argue that many women want to be raped and that it does not bother them at all to be raped by men even when they verbally protest…”  Lady Rectitude, one of Christine’s guides in The Book of the City of Ladies, responds “Rest assured, dear friend, chaste ladies who live honestly take absolutely no pleasure in being raped. Indeed, rape is the greatest possible sorrow for them. Many upright women have demonstrated that this is true with their own credible examples…”

    In 1418, Christine retired to a convent in Poissy.  At the convent she wrote one final poem which she dedicated to Joan of Arc.  It is the only known French language work about Joan of Arc written during Joan’s lifetime.

    — 2 days ago with 1148 notes

    fashionsfromhistory:

    Underwear

    Attr. Louise Neut

    1940-1949

    MET

    — 3 days ago with 385 notes
    jeannepompadour:

Goddesses Isis (right) and Nephthys (left) mourning the death of Osiris 664–30 B.C. Ptolemaic period

    jeannepompadour:

    Goddesses Isis (right) and Nephthys (left) mourning the death of Osiris 664–30 B.C. Ptolemaic period

    (via lordozner)

    — 3 days ago with 53 notes

    reeferkitten:

    king-faded:

    angelclark:

    Historic Black and White Pictures Restored in Color
    1. Women Delivering Ice, 1918
    2. Times Square, 1947
    3. Portrait Used to Design the Penny. President Lincoln Meets General McClellan – Antietam, Maryland ca September 1862
    4. Marilyn Monroe, 1957
    5. Newspaper boy Ned Parfett sells copies of the evening paper bearing news of Titanic’s sinking the night before. (April 16, 1912)
    6. Easter Eggs for Hitler, c 1944-1945 
    7. Sergeant George Camblair practicing with a gas mask in a smokescreen – Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 1942
    8. Helen Keller meeting Charlie Chaplin in 1919
    9. Painting WWII Propaganda Posters, Port Washington, New York – 8 July 1942
    10. Construction of the Golden Gate Bridge ca 1935

    This is awesome.

    Not something I’d typically reblog but I like.

    (via thehistoricalsociety)

    — 4 days ago with 213077 notes
    Pagans in the late Roman Empire →

    historical-nonfiction:

    "At the end of the 4th century in Rome there was a desperate last-ditch battle by the wealthy patrician families to preserve the old pagan religions, the ancient way of life, in the face of the ever-growing strength of Christianity, which had become the official state religion in 380.

    The…

    (Source: vam.ac.uk)

    — 4 days ago with 301 notes

    thestuartkings:

    The Princess Elizabeth of England and Scotland (28 December 1635–8 September 1650) was the second daughter of King Charles I of England and Henrietta Maria of France. From the age of six until her early death at the age of fourteen she was a prisoner of Parliament during the English Civil War. Her emotional written account of her final meeting with her father on the eve of his execution and his final words to his children have been published in numerous histories. 

    On the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, Princess Elizabeth, along with her brother Henry Duke of Gloucester, were placed under the care of Parliament. In 1643, the seven-year-old Elizabeth was moved to Chelsea with her brother. She was tutored by the great female scholar Bathsua Makin until 1644, by which time she could read and write in HebrewGreekItalianLatin and French. Other prominent scholars dedicated works to her, and were amazed by her flair for religious reading.  In 1647, Elizabeth, James Duke of York and the Duke of Gloucester were permitted to travel to Maidenhead to meet the King, and spent two days with him. A relationship was established. This came to an end when the king was forced to flee to Carisbrooke Castle on the Isle of Wight.

    Elizabeth was called “Temperance" in the family for her kind nature. The turmoil under which she had grown up had produced a young woman of unusual character. When she was eleven, the French ambassador described the princess as a “budding young beauty” who had “grace, dignity, intelligence and sensibility” that enabled her to judge the different people she met and understand different points of view.

    The king was captured and sentenced to death by Oliver Cromwell and the other judges in 1649. On 29 January a highly emotional final meeting occurred between Elizabeth, the Duke of Gloucester and her father. Elizabeth, who was then thirteen, while her younger brother was eight years old, wrote an account of the meeting that was found among her possessions after her death: “He told me he was glad I was come, and although he had not time to say much, yet somewhat he had to say to me which he had not to another, or leave in writing, because he feared their cruelty was such as that they would not have permitted him to write to me.” Elizabeth was crying so hard that her father asked her if she would be able to remember everything he told her. She promised never to forget and said she would record it in writing. Her father told his sobbing daughter not to “grieve and torment herself for him”. He also gave her a bible.

    In 1650, Elizabeth’s brother, the now titular Charles II journeyed to Scotland to be crowned king of that country. Elizabeth was moved to the Isle of Wight as a hostage. This move was probably the cause of her death. The Princess complained that her health was not equal to moving, but it went ahead anyway; she caught a cold, which quickly developed into pneumonia, and died on 8 September 1650. Some accounts say that Elizabeth was found dead with her head on the Bible her father had given her. 

    Her grave was left unmarked, with the exception of her carved initials, until the 19th century when Queen Victoria commanded that a suitable monument be erected to her memory. A white marble sculpture was commissioned for her grave that depicted Elizabeth as a beautiful young woman, lying with her cheek on a Bible open to words from Gospel of Matthew: “Come unto Me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” Above the sculpture is a grating, indicating that she was a prisoner, but the bars are broken to show that the prisoner has now escaped to “a greater rest” The plaque reads: “To the memory of The Princess Elizabeth, daughter of King Charles I, who died at Carisbrooke Castle on September 8, 1630, and is interred beneath the chancel of this church, this monument is erected as a token of respect for her virtues and of sympathy for her misfortunes, by Victoria R., 1856.”

    (Source: Wikipedia)

    — 5 days ago with 298 notes
    "Medieval England experienced some spectacular rulers, both male and female. This was an age, in particular, of extraordinary and resourceful women: consider Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen of Henry II, who continued shaping government policy, escorting brides across Europe, and leading armies well into her seventies. Isabella of France, wife of Edward II, launched an invasion against her ineffectual husband alongside her lover, deposed the king, and was possibly involved in his later murder. Then there was Margaret of Anjou, who courageously took hold of the reins of government when her saintly if unassuming husband Henry VI fell into madness, and took a spirited and energetic role of leadership in the conflict known as the Wars of the Roses, so vividly depicted in the works of Shakespeare. Elizabeth Woodville was another courageous and strong-willed queen who fought for the Yorkist inheritance during the Wars of the Roses and was every bit as formidable as her adversary Margaret. All of these women have, to differing degrees, been remembered as ‘she-wolves’: powerful, determined women who seized the reins of power seen as correctly belonging to their husbands, defying contemporary expectations of females as weak, gentle and submissive beings."
    — 5 days ago with 116 notes

    1956- Gordon Parks documented the everyday lives of an extended black family living in rural Alabama under Jim Crow segregation for Life magazine’s photo-essay “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” (via)

    (Source: vintagegal, via imnotinthefruitbusiness)

    — 6 days ago with 54943 notes
    the-world-turning:

lissabryan:

Katharine was only six years older than Henry. If she was “pathetic and old,” he was, too. Especially since he was chasing around his wife’s maids of honor, who weren’t even born yet when he first got married.

Katharine was only twenty-four when they married, a beautiful young princess in the prime of life. And let’s not forget, Henry chose her, not vice-versa. Whether he did it for love … or because she was the daughter of the powerful “Catholic Kings” of Spain … or because Katharine’s ancestral claim to the English throne was actually stronger than Henry’s … Henry was the one who decided they should marry. He wanted to marry her so badly, he lied about his father begging him on his deathbed to marry the Spanish princess and fulfill the betrothal.
In her youth, Katharine was lovely. We don’t see it often, because most of her widely-known portraits were made after Katharine was in middle age, her body worn out by numerous pregnancies. And in the movies, she’s always portrayed as a dark-haired, middle-aged woman. But when she was young, Katharine was regarded as a beauty, with strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes. 

Artist Michael Sittow seems to have seen Katharine as a muse. He painted several portraits of the princess.

Katharine as the Virgin

Katharine as the Magdalene
During her marriage to Henry, Katharine was pregnant at least six times - possibly eight. As she told Henry during the Great Matter, “By me you have had many children, though it has pleased God to call them from the world.” Katharine’s only “failure” was that her three baby boys died, either before birth or shortly thereafter.
Katharine was an amazing queen and a strong woman. As much as I love Anne Boleyn, I admire Katharine for her virtues and regal fortitude. She died fighting for her rightful title, and the inheritance rights of her daughter. Because of her refusal to capitulate, she never got to see her daughter again, a terrible price for any mother to pay.
In the end, it really wasn’t about having a son for Henry. It was about his own desires. An heir was only an excuse. That’s why he executed Anne Boleyn when she still had plenty of fertile years left, and annulled his marriage to Anna von Kleefes without even trying. Not to mention his final marriage to Kateryn Parr, widely regarded as being infertile after not producing any children in either of her previous marriages.
If anyone was pathetic, it was Henry, whose mid-life crisis shattered a thousand years of religious tradition and led to oceans of spilled blood. Not to mention his horrific lack of concern for the lives of anyone who got in the way of his immediate desires. 

PREACH

    the-world-turning:

    lissabryan:

    Katharine was only six years older than Henry. If she was “pathetic and old,” he was, too. Especially since he was chasing around his wife’s maids of honor, who weren’t even born yet when he first got married.

    Katharine was only twenty-four when they married, a beautiful young princess in the prime of life. And let’s not forget, Henry chose her, not vice-versa. Whether he did it for love … or because she was the daughter of the powerful “Catholic Kings” of Spain … or because Katharine’s ancestral claim to the English throne was actually stronger than Henry’s … Henry was the one who decided they should marry. He wanted to marry her so badly, he lied about his father begging him on his deathbed to marry the Spanish princess and fulfill the betrothal.

    In her youth, Katharine was lovely. We don’t see it often, because most of her widely-known portraits were made after Katharine was in middle age, her body worn out by numerous pregnancies. And in the movies, she’s always portrayed as a dark-haired, middle-aged woman. But when she was young, Katharine was regarded as a beauty, with strawberry blonde hair and blue eyes. 

    Artist Michael Sittow seems to have seen Katharine as a muse. He painted several portraits of the princess.

    Katharine as the Virgin

    Katharine as the Magdalene

    During her marriage to Henry, Katharine was pregnant at least six times - possibly eight. As she told Henry during the Great Matter, “By me you have had many children, though it has pleased God to call them from the world.” Katharine’s only “failure” was that her three baby boys died, either before birth or shortly thereafter.

    Katharine was an amazing queen and a strong woman. As much as I love Anne Boleyn, I admire Katharine for her virtues and regal fortitude. She died fighting for her rightful title, and the inheritance rights of her daughter. Because of her refusal to capitulate, she never got to see her daughter again, a terrible price for any mother to pay.

    In the end, it really wasn’t about having a son for Henry. It was about his own desires. An heir was only an excuse. That’s why he executed Anne Boleyn when she still had plenty of fertile years left, and annulled his marriage to Anna von Kleefes without even trying. Not to mention his final marriage to Kateryn Parr, widely regarded as being infertile after not producing any children in either of her previous marriages.

    If anyone was pathetic, it was Henry, whose mid-life crisis shattered a thousand years of religious tradition and led to oceans of spilled blood. Not to mention his horrific lack of concern for the lives of anyone who got in the way of his immediate desires. 

    PREACH

    (Source: real-tudor-confessions, via bethwoodvilles)

    — 6 days ago with 1342 notes